Author: NXP (page 1 of 4)

St. Francis joins Nexus Prayer

St. Francis of Assisi (1182-​1226)

JESUS, SAINT FRANCIS, & NEXUS PRAYER
A WINNING COMBINATION

Nexus prayer has been a part of my daily spiritual activities for more than two years now. During that time, God has been ever-so-slowly transforming me from the inside out as I’ve spent quality one-on-one time just listening to him in prayer. As a result, I believe I’m a kinder, gentler, and wiser version (he said humbly) of my former self. That’s not so surprising since I’m convinced that the more time we spend with Jesus, the more we become like Jesus.

But what has been surprising this year is my increased awareness of and interest in all things Franciscan. Perhaps I should not be so shocked by my attraction to Saint Francis as I’ve worn a San Damiano cross for over twenty years, and as mentioned elsewhere on this site, most of the spiritual mentors who have been busy planting seeds in my soul for years are all Franciscans – John Michael Talbot, Richard Rohr, and Murray Bodo to name just a few. I just never thought of myself actually becoming a Franciscan. Until now.

“The more time we spend with Jesus, the more we become like Jesus.”

The Franciscan vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, along with their companion values of simplicity, humility, harmony, compassion, service, and prayer all resonate with me. Those admirable qualities notwithstanding, there are several important reasons why I am compelled to embrace a Franciscan lifestyle today, and why I have been prayerfully discerning a call to a Franciscan vocation (Anglican or Secular Order) in the near future.

All of these Franciscan virtues (Jesus’ virtues really) will be explored in future posts to my journal. For now, however, suffice it to say that there are several important reasons I feel led by God to begin walking in this new direction…

THE DIVIDED STATES OF AMERICA
First, because perhaps like no other time in the history of our country (at least during my lifetime), many of our government leaders and people in our society (including Christians) seem to reflect the divided states, rather than the United States of America. Whether the issue is immigration, race, gun control, religion, gay rights, women’s rights, or the plethora of other human issues, the current social and political climate have never been more polarizing. Us versus them.

THE NEED TO DO SOMETHING
Second, thanks to nexus prayer, I believe I am closer to God than ever before and clearly hear His call to be obedient to step forward as an advocate for all the disenfranchised and most vulnerable members of our society wherever I am able. I desire to be a voice of love, peace, and compassion in contrast to so many who are stoking the coals of hatred and the flames of bigotry and racism. I can’t do everything, but I can do something and believe it is my Christian responsibility to do so. James 4:17 This is just one reason why my wife works in the field of sex and human trafficking at Redeemed Ministries and why I’ve recently begun volunteering at the Hope Center – a ministry that serves the homeless men and women in the North Houston Area.

THE IMITATION OF CHRIST
Finally,  although I will never measure up to the examples of Jesus, Thomas á Kempis, and Saint Francis, I feel led to walk down this path today because I believe as Christians we are called…

  • To recognize the human dignity of every person as created in the image of God. Genesis 1:26-27 | Genesis 2:7
  • To be good stewards of our planet and take good care of God’s creation. Genesis 1:1-31
  • To share God’s unconditional love for all, and be a light in the darkness. John 3:16 | Matthew 22:36-40 | I John 4:7-12
  • To live the Gospel radically for “the least of these” Matthew 25:34-45 | Matthew 5:16
  • To be advocates for justice for the most vulnerable in our society: the poor, aged, sick, homeless, refugees, immigrants, and victims of sex and human trafficking. Isaiah 61:1 | Matthew 25:34-40
  • To be peacemakers. Matthew 5:9 | Matthew 5:11-17

Prayer is good. Nexus prayer is great. But as the Apostle James reminds us, “Faith without works is dead.” James 2:14-17 To this end, I’ve already taken steps in my life to be the hands, feet, and voice of Christ in my generation (more on this later), just as I believe Saint Francis did for his. In other words, the prayer usually attributed to Saint Francis has also become my prayer:

Lord Make Me an Instrument
Lord make me an instrument of your peace
Where there is hatred let me sow love
Where there is injury, pardon
Where there is doubt, faith
Where there is despair, hope
Where there is darkness, light
And where there is sadness, joy
O divine master grant that I may
not so much seek to be consoled as to console
to be understood as to understand
To be loved as to love
For it is in giving that we receive
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned
And it’s in dying that we are born to eternal life
Amen

Image Credit | Saint Francis of Assisi
The oldest surviving depiction of Saint Francis is a fresco near the entrance of the Benedictine abbey of Subiaco, painted between March 1228 and March 1229. | In Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons and License Art Libre.

 

“All of humanity’s problems stem from man’s inability to sit quietly in a room alone.” ~ Blaise Pascal, Pensées

Less is More

Photo Credit: NXP Stats | © 2017 Copyright Allen Aaron White | Used with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

Today I read Robert Browning’s Andrea del Sarto¹ where, in the dramatic monologue of the eponymous renaissance artist, he has Andrea comment to Lucrezia, “Less is more.” (Yes, that’s where the well-known and often quoted axiom originated.)

I wonder if Browning really had Psalm 46:10 in mind when writing this, but not likely, as for most of his life Robert Browning² struggled with religion. At age 13, Robert announced he was atheist, although as he got older he considered himself a Theist. But I digress. Yes, I agree, Andrea. Less is more. Especially when it comes to nexus prayer.

I’m writing on this theme today because we live in a society where bigger is always considered better, and super-sizing everything is the norm. Subconsciously, I think this creates unrealistic expectations for nexus prayer, especially those new to the prayer practice. That’s because I’ve recently noticed a trend with beginners who (falsely) conclude that if five minutes of prayer is good, then ten, fifteen, or even twenty minutes (an hour?) of nexus prayer must be better, right? Not so fast. I thought so too in the beginning. But I quickly learned that the 5-minute Nexus Prayer was my friend. So, you’ll often here me say, “Embrace the 5!”

“Less is more.”

After you’ve experienced two or three successful nexus prayers of five minutes in duration – especially when you realize how good it feels to just be still in sacred silence – it is quite normal to think you’re ready to double up and jump to ten minutes. Maybe you are. But I strongly encourage you to utilize the five-minute interval once a day exclusively for at least the first week. If you do, by week’s end you will have spent 35 minutes just be-ing with God. That’s a big step when you consider most of us don’t spend any time at all being still and knowing God. Of course, you’ll want more (trust me on this), so keep embracing the 5, but instead of once a day, try twice a day – say morning and night. Do that and you just spent over an hour with God in a week! Then, and only then will you be ready for increased units of time.

All of that said, I had something to celebrate last Fall as I achieved another personal nexus prayer milestone … 500 total hours of duration, more than 3,000 prayer sessions, and over 1,000 days of praying nexus prayer since 2015. Translation?  The hours of duration equal the total amount of time I’ve spent being still and knowing God Psalm 46:10 – most achieved in only 5 or 10-minute increments of prayer time. Did you catch that? Most of my 500 hours of prayer were accomplished in 5-minute increments!

Please know that I’m not boasting or bragging here (God knows I should and need to do better.) I’m only sharing this to demonstrate that we should never underestimate the power of spending “only” five minutes with God. Don’t have time to pray, you say? Amazing what can be done with only five minutes a day. Text me and I’ll join you.

Quality, not quantity. Less is more. Embrace the 5!

 NOTES & REFERENCES

1 Andrea del Sarto | Poetry Foundation

2 Robert Browning |  Less is More  |Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

3 Photo Credit: NXP Stats | © 2017 Copyright Allen Aaron White | Used with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

4 A prayer timer app such as the one by Meditation Timer Pro can be very helpful for Nexus Prayer.

Praying On the Go

 “Lawnmower” by Daniel Watson | Public Domain via Unsplash | Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

BE STILL & DO

Without question, the very best way to maximize the benefits and enjoy the experience of nexus prayer is to pray when we are still, quiet, and undistracted. Better still (no pun intended), is to practice nexus prayer in a sacred space.  Whether in an intimate chapel, a cathedral, a beautifully landscaped garden, or even sitting alone on a bench by a lake, there is something special, something holy about praying in a sacred space. But if you live a busy, multi-tasking, and all-too-often stressful life like mine, the opportunities to just “get away from it all” to some secluded spiritual oasis are few and far between. Besides, the Apostle Paul exhorts us as Christians to pray without ceasing for everything, everyone, and everywhere I Thessalonians 5:17, I Timothy 2:1-8. For these reasons, we must learn to pray nexus prayer during our ordinary, everyday lives but also while we are on the go.

“Ordinary Prayer” by Allen White | Copyright ©2017 Nexus Prayer International. All rights reserved.

Allen & Rugby take a 5 minute break from work for Nexus Prayer.

ORDINARY TIME
FOR PRAYER

We spend most of our time here on earth doing quite mundane, ordinary things with our time: eating, working, attending school, doing the dishes or laundry, gardening, and cooking to name just a few.

Interestingly, it is not a requirement, nor do we necessarily need to find special times or places (though it helps) for prayer in our life. That’s because there are dozens, maybe even hundreds of opportunities in our lives every single day for prayer in general, and nexus prayer in particular. For example, because my schedule permits it today, I’m going to stop what I’m doing right now (writing this post) and do a 5 minute nexus prayer. (Be right back.) Done!

Likewise, although I awaken every morning at 5am for special, uninterrupted nexus prayer before beginning my day, I routinely pray nexus prayer every time I mow the lawn. After all, cutting grass is a pretty mindless activity.  Try it and you’ll see that you can perform a 5 minute or even a 20 minute nexus prayer while mowing, gardening, pulling weeds, or almost any outdoor activity.¹ If you want to learn how to pray on the spiritual mountain tops, you first need to learn how to pray on terra firma. So, after we turn off the TV, we shouldn’t have to look too hard or too far to find a few minutes for prayer right there under our nose.

BE STILL … AND GO!

No, that’s not an oxymoron. It’s a fact. Ours is a very mobile generation. Setting aside for the moment how much time we spend on our mobile phones and devices, American drivers spend an average of 17,600 minutes behind the wheel of their car each year.² That being so, why not put that enormous block of time to work? Or to prayer? Between errands, church, commute time to and from work, appointments, shopping, and more, we spend a lot of time going places in our vehicles. So why not make your car or truck a vehicle for prayer? I call it praying with my eyes wide open. Add to that the time we spend waiting in line for a drivers’ license, making bank deposits, fast food drive thrus, and the like, and the time adds up quickly. Wasted time? Not much in my life nowadays as I typically use those 5, 10, and 15 minute waits in line at the post office and pharmacy drive thru for nexus prayer.

Don’t have time to pray? Think again. In fact, why not pray right now? Nexus prayer can be done in as little as five minutes a day and The Steps are easy to learn. Questions? Feel free to contact me anytime!

NOTES & CREDITS

1 Be Still & Do | Like being still and praying while on the go, this appears to be an oxymoron. It is unusual I admit. However, Nexus Prayer is first and foremost just “BE-ing” with, listening to God. It is a conversation with God doing most of the talking. We multitask and have conversations with others all the time in our daily lives. Why not with Nexus Prayer?

2 American Driving Habits | AAA Report, September 8, 2016 | American Automobile Association

3 Photo Credit: “Lawnmower” by Daniel Watson | Public Domain via Unsplash | Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

4 Photo Credit: “Ordinary Prayer” by Allen White | Copyright ©2017  Nexus Prayer International. All rights reserved.

“Prayer is not asking. Prayer is putting oneself in the hands of God, at His disposition, and listening to His voice in the depth of our hearts.”  ― Mother Teresa

Resolutionary Praying

RESOLUTIONARY PRAYING

When the brother of Jesus¹ wrote in James 4:14 “Whereas ye know not what shall be on the morrow. For what is your life? It is even a vapour, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away”, perhaps he had in mind the rhetorical question, “Where does all the time go”? I find myself asking that same question about 2017 with a hot cup of tea and a warm bagel on this first cold January morning of 2018 – the first day of a new week of a new month and a new year.

Like most years, and as I mentioned in my post Praying Resolutely exactly one year ago today, I don’t make resolutions per se. Instead, each year around the time the first cold front arrives, and usually during my evening prayer walks, I begin conducting my personal and spiritual inventory of what I accomplished (or did not accomplish) in the previous year.

Now, don’t get me wrong, like most everyone else I do have a long list of personal, family, home, business, and even financial goals I’d like I need to accomplish this year, but I prefer having one larger all-encompassing resolution – a theme as it were – for my year. Last year it was to pray more. This year, though I doubt I’ll pray less, my main aspiration is to draw close – even closer – to God. Needless to say, I plan on accomplishing this through nexus prayer, which brings me back to James …

“Draw near to God, and he will draw near to you…” – James 4:8

Just like Psalm 46:10 in the Old Testament, this short verse in the New Testament – another command with a promise – is pregnant with meaning. Simply put, if we desire to have more of God in our lives in 2018, then we only need to initiate our intention – through prayer – to be present to God and He will meet us there. Jesus referred to it as going to pray in our inner room (the subject of a future post), Matthew 6:6, and I know of no better way to connect with God there than through nexus prayer, but I’ll let my fifty-two journal posts this year (I plan on writing one a week, of which this is the first) explain how this may best be achieved.

I look forward to sharing these spiritual insights with you throughout 2018 right here on the Nexus Prayer website and through our local prayer group gatherings, but for now, I’ll close with arguably the most important lesson of Psalm 46:10 found in Step 4 of nexus prayer. Namely, being still or letting go. If you are like me, 2017 was filled with many blessings, achievements, and successes, as well as a few disappointments along the way. That said, last night during my prayer walk and after taking one more long good look in my mental rear-view mirror, I left the not-so-great parts of 2017 behind me, while carrying forward into the new year all the goodness of last year – the people, the experiences, the memories, lessons learned, and wisdom gained.

May all the blessings of Emmanuel – God with us – be yours not only today, the eighth day of Christmas and first day of the new year, but every day of 2018 as you draw closer to God through nexus prayer. Amen.

Now, just for fun, and thanks to Statistics Brain, here are the results for 2017’s top ten resolutions in America.² And just in case you are one of those people who actually enjoy making New Year’s resolutions, how about this one? Resolve to join me in praying no less than a five minute nexus prayer 365 times (once each day) in 2018. I’ve made that commitment, and hope you’ll join me in adding more prayer in general, and more nexus prayer in particular to the top of your list! Happy New Year!

AMERICA’S TOP TEN NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS FOR 2017

1 Lose Weight / Healthier Eating | 21.4%
2 Life / Self Improvements | 12.3%
3 Better Financial Decisions | 8.5%
4 Quit Smoking | 7.1%
5 Do more exciting things | 6.3%
6 Spend More Time with Family / Close Friends | 6.2%
7 Work out more often | 5.5%
8 Learn something new on my own | 5.3%
9 Do more good deeds for others | 5.2%
10 Find the love of my life | 4.3%

NOTES & REFERENCES

1 James the brother of Jesus | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia | There is disagreement about the exact relationship of James to Jesus. The presumed author of the Epistle of James is also sometimes identified with James, son of Alphaeus, James, son of Zebedee, and James the Less.

2 Top 10 Resolutions for 2017 | Statistic Brain Research Institute

3 Photo Credit: Happy New Year 2018 | By Nordwood Themes in Public Domain via Unsplash | Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

Jesus Christ is Born

This is an audio post. Turn up your speakers, hit “play”, and enjoy the music of Advent.
Merry Christmas from Allen & Nexus Prayer | Christmas Eve, 2017

“Jesus Christ is Born”

“Sing it up high, sing it down low. Sing far and wide that Jesus Christ is Lord. Sing it up high, sing it down low. Sing ’til the whole world knows that Jesus Christ is born.”

 

“A long time ago like the prophets foretold Immanuel came. Born to a virgin by the Holy Ghost as Gabriel did say.  Laid in a manger of hay for his bed, the Shepherds prayed., while Mary and Joseph and Kings from the East their homage gave.” – allen aaron white

The Songs of Christmas continue on Christmas Day: “Praise to the Newborn King” Enjoy!

NOTES & REFERENCES

  • “Jesus Christ is Born” – Text inspired by Isaiah 7:14 | Isaiah 9:6 | Luke 2:1-20 | John 3:16
  • “Jesus Christ is Born” | Nexus Prayer International
    Copyright © 1996 Christmark Music, Inc.

    Nexus Prayer International | All Rights Reserved.
    Words, music, and classical guitar: Allen Aaron White
    Arranged and Produced: Jeff Nelson
    Soloist: Howard Meell
  • Crèche Photo:  Copyright © 2017 Allen Aaron White | Used with permission Nexus Prayer International | Christmas Eve, 2017

Praise to the Newborn King

This is an audio post. Turn up your speakers, hit “play”, and enjoy the music of Advent.
Merry Christmas from Allen & Nexus Prayer | Christmas Day, 2017

Alleluia! Let all creation sing. Alleluia!
Praise to the newborn King.”

 

“Close your eyes and go to sleep. Jesus, hush your cry. All creation lauds your birth with this lullaby. Born God’s Son in Bethlehem, Savior at his birth. Prince of Peace, Emmanuel. King of all the Earth. Sleep, sleep, sleep. Sweet, Jesus, sleep. – aaw

Did you miss the Songs of Christmas for Christmas Eve “Jesus Christ is Born”? Enjoy!

NOTES & REFERENCES

  • “Praise to the Newborn King” – Text inspired by Isaiah 7:14; 9:6 | Luke 2:1-20 | John 3:16
  • “Praise to the Newborn King” | Nexus Prayer International
    Copyright © 1993 Christmark Music, Inc.

    Nexus Prayer International | All Rights Reserved.
    Words and music: Allen Aaron White
    Arranged and produced: Jeff Nelson
    Soloist: Howard Meell
  • Crèche Photo:  Copyright © 2017 Allen Aaron White | Used with permission by Nexus Prayer International | Christmas Day 2017

Immanuel or Emmanuel?

Bethlehem Crèche | Photo by Allen Aaron White. Courtesy of Jack and Valerie Murray. © Copyright 2017 Nexus Prayer International

IMMANUEL or EMMANUEL?
Either way… God with Us!

Second Sunday of Advent | December 10, 2017

As both a continuation of my celebration of Advent¹ this year, and in preparation for the final lesson of 2017 that I’ll be sharing with our Nexus Prayer circle tomorrow morning at Saint Dunstan’s , I thought I’d share a few random thoughts here in my prayer journal about the reason for the season – the birth of Immanuel. Or is it Emmanuel?

From previous lessons and posts that I’ve shared, we know that embedded deeply within the ancient Hebrew of Psalm 46:10 there are no less than five unique names of God: Elohim, I Am, YHWH (Yahweh), Be, and an allusion to the Holy Trinity that is originally found in Genesis 1:1. But although not literally listed, there is yet another “name” to be found in Psalm 46 – namely (pun intended): Immanuel. Whether you prefer to use “Immanuel” from the ancient Hebrew found in Isaiah 7:14, or the transliterated² Greek “Emmanuel” found in Matthew 1:21-23, I placed the word “name” above in quotes because technically neither are an actual name of Jesus. They are instead descriptions or titles.

There are many places in both the Old and New Testaments that declare how Jesus is to be referred to or called. The best examples were also provided to us by the prophet Isaiah when he wrote in Isaiah 9:6: “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.” Like the “name” Immanuel, none of those listed by Isaiah are actual, literal names, but rather titles or descriptives of the (coming) Messiah.

Interestingly, “Emmanuel” found in Matthew 1:21-23 appears only once in the entire New Testament, and although Isaiah makes a second mention of “Immanuel” in Isaiah 8:8, that reference is to the Jews of Israel, not the Messiah. So, there is actually only one reference to the coming Messiah in the Old Testament as well – the reference to the birth of Jesus some 735 years before it happened!

And what of the references to “Immanuel” in Psalm 46 that I spoke of? There are no less than three, but you’ll have to read my post on Emmanuel: God with Us from last Christmas to learn even more. But before continuing, why not take a moment and enjoy the following video “Immanuel: El is with Us”³ inspired by a Christmas Eve sermon delivered by Charles Spurgeon³.

 

NOTES & REFERENCES

1 Advent | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

2 Transliterated Greek or Romanized Hebrew | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

3 “Immanuel: El is with Us” Video | Courtesy of Qandnotu2 on YouTube | Published December 23, 2013 | Based on a sermon delivered by Charles Spurgeon on Christmas Eve, 1854.

4 Charles Haddon Spurgeon | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

5 Photo Credit: Bethlehem Crèche | Original photo by Allen Aaron White. With thanks and kind permission of Jack & Valerie Murray for allowing photography of their beautiful Nativity that is hand-carved from olive wood, originated in Bethlehem, and has a place of honor in their home every Christmas season. © Copyright 2017 Nexus Prayer International.

Being Still – Rx for the Body and Soul

Palms Up Praying Hands | Photo by Jeremy Yap in Public Domain via Unsplash | Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.Being Still – Rx for the Body and Soul

“Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered.” Romans 8:26

First, there was Halloween, followed by All Saints Day, All Souls Day, then last Sunday night’s beautiful Requiem Eucharist at Saint Dunstan’s. Then all hell broke loose, and it was all downhill from there.

That’s because for the better part of six days (and counting) I’m weary from wrestling with some mysterious influenza bug of unknown origin that’s gotten the best of me and kept me bed-ridden most of the time. Sick as a dog and really too weak to do much else, you’d think it would be a perfect time to spend more time in nexus prayer. That’s what I thought, too, but that’s not exactly how it has worked out for me. But I digress.

The scripture I cited from Romans at the top of this page has come to mind many times this week as I’ve struggled to maintain my normal, daily nexus prayer regimen. I realized that was easier said than done when, on day one of my solitary confinement, I set my alarm for my usual 4:54 am wake-up call, began my customary 30-minute nexus prayer, and did not realize until some ninety minutes later than I had fallen asleep and never even got past step one!  It’s remarkable how the mind wanders and how, when either deprived of sleep or over-medicated, a simple five-minute nexus prayer can take almost an hour to complete. But despite the challenges, I’ve been able to glean some valuable spiritual insights from my bedroom-turned laboratory and this urban monk-turned guinea pig. In no particular order, then, here are a few lessons for us all, but especially for me:

“Let go, and LET GOD do the heavy lifting.”

Lesson 1In times of trouble, distress, and illness follow Martin Luther’s example of turning to the God of Psalm 46 for comfort. As we know today, Luther loved this psalm so much he set it to music as “A Mighty Fortress is our God”.¹ He both recited and sang Psalm 46 quite often, especially when he was under heavy persecution. It begins: “God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.” Psalm 46:1 Are you overwhelmed with your present circumstances, including illness? God is your refuge and strength! Run to Him.

Lesson 2Embrace the 5. Having spent more than two years of practicing nexus prayer, I can tell you that the 5-minute prayer interval is the Rodney Dangerfield of prayer. It gets no respect. The biggest mistake beginners to nexus prayer encounter is underestimating the value of simply spending five minutes with God. All too often, newbies to the prayer practice attempt the 20, 30, even 60-minute intervals all too soon, or attempt praying for five minutes, but do so something like twenty times a day. Also, not a good idea. Indeed, since first launching Nexus Prayer in 2015, I have logged more than 3,400 prayer sessions for a total duration of about 547 hours. That’s praying nexus prayer – connecting to God daily – more than 500 hours with most of those sessions coming in 5-minute intervals. And being bed-ridden this past week – the sickest I can recall ever being in my life – I discovered more than ever that the five-minute nexus prayer is my friend.

Lesson 3Be realistic. Do not strive for perfection. God neither demands nor desires perfection from us in our prayer time, just our intention. The mind wanders. Accept this fact. External noises and internal distractions, memories, thoughts, etc.… while we are praying are ever-present. Let them go. We get tired and sometimes fall asleep while praying. It’s okay! It’s not about how many minutes we pray a day, but our simple intention to just “be” and spend any amount of time with God. The closest human bond is probably that of a mother and her child. What mother does not love for her baby to fall asleep in her arms as she lovingly caresses, cradles, and whispers in a still, small voice words of love? Do we think God – our Abba Father – cares for us any less when we drift asleep in those moments we draw near to Him through nexus prayer?

Lesson 4 Praying Psalm 46:10 is full of obstacles – especially when we are sick. As mentioned previously, the mind wanders; our spirit is willing, but our body is weak Matthew 26:41. Our symptoms and nagging pain, even with the common cold or flu, can be a major distraction, how much more serious health issues such as diabetes, cancer, stroke, or heart problems to name just a few. Big or small, God can handle them all.

Lesson 5 – Let God do the heavy lifting. Praying when it is the hardest for us to do so is the most important time for us to pray. Just be still and let God do the heavy lifting. God knows what we need before we can even ask or think. Remember the verse at the beginning of this post? “Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered.” Romans 8:26 Sometimes, we are simply unable to pray. No words. No strength. Perfect! Just where God wants us.

Finally, at the time of this writing, several members of our Sunday morning nexus prayer circle are either in bed sick, recuperating from surgery, or remain in the hospital. Although they can’t be with us physically, I’ve joined them virtually throughout the week via synchronized prayer², and I’ve encouraged them to connect with God and me every chance they get. I never tire of hearing or sharing with them the comforting words of Matthew 18:20.

Although my personal physical battles with sickness this week presented significant challenges for me, they are simply mosquito bites compared to those who suffer each and every day from serious and chronic illness. This has both raised my awareness and increased my compassion for those suffering from debilitating physical and mental injuries and disease. How can I – we – best share nexus prayer with them so that they, too, can benefit from hearing God’s still, small voice and experience Christ’s suffering love for them? I don’t know the answer yet, but I’m more compelled than ever to discover how. God will show the Way…through nexus prayer.

NOTES & REFERENCES

1 “A Mighty Fortress is our God.”| Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

2 Synchronized Prayer | NexusPrayer.org

3 Photo Credit: Palms Up Praying Hands | Photo by Jeremy Yap in Public Domain via Unsplash | Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

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