Nexus Prayer Journal

Photo by Mikhail Pavstyuk | Public domain photo used and modified by permission via Unsplash. | Nexus Prayer International.

 

Welcome to my journal! Here you will find my personal ruminations, journal entries, and experiences with nexus prayer…and more.

Although I add new entries, practical tips, and suggestions for improving your nexus prayer practice regularly, much of the content you will find here is taken directly from my original observations and notebooks of 2015 while conducting my one year (365 consecutive days) of research, intensive study, and development of Nexus Prayer.

In addition, here you will also find my occasional commentary on current events, Franciscan spirituality, church history, and other forms of prayer.

“We hear God best when we are still and silent.”

It is my sincerest prayer that by sharing my personal insights about nexus prayer and other spiritual topics here, that you, also, will come to discover not only a deeper communion with Jesus Christ, but experience the unconditional love of God and the “peace of God that passes all understanding” that can be yours through the quietude of nexus prayer. After all, we hear God best when we are still and silent.

 “Be still, and know that I am God.” Psalm 46:10

Tired of reading? Ready to begin? Nexus prayer can be done in as little as five minutes a day and The Steps are easy to learn. Questions? Feel free to contact me anytime!

NOTES & CREDITS

Original Photo Credit: Books photoby Mikail Pavstyuk in Public Domain used and modified by permission via Unsplash. | Nexus Prayer International.

Cairns of Prayer

CAIRNS OF PRAYER

I recently reached a new milestone and marked it with another cairn. A cairn of nexus prayer. A cairn on my prayer timer.

Cairns¹, from the Scottish Gaelic: càrn, are human-made piles of stones that have been used from prehistoric times and that are still being used today for many and varied purposes, including landmarks, milestones, monument markers, and sometimes for ceremonial purposes such as identifying a famous gravesite or significant battle ground. For example, cairns or milestones were used to mark key distances and landmarks along the Appian Way² (Rome’s oldest road), and are still used today to indicate important or dangerous paths along remote jungle, densely forested, or mountainous areas such as some of the trails I’ve hiked leading to a few sacred spaces in Switzerland. Interestingly, for centuries historical monument markers were so prolific in Europe that in ancient Roman religion the Romans even had their own god, Terminus³, whose sole purpose was the protection of boundary markers. Of course, in everyday circumstances from the time we enter this world to the time we depart it, the term “milestone” is used in more casual ways to mark special occasions along our journey in this life such as the birth of a child, graduation, an engagement or marriage, job promotion, or significant awards and achievements.

All of that said, and as mentioned earlier, I have a personal cairn of my own to share – a cairn of prayer. Please know this is no humblebrag (though it’s true I’m both happy and humbled), but just last week I surpassed the 5,000 mark for completed individual nexus prayers. Sure, there’s good reason to celebrate because, after all, it took me the better part of three years of multiple daily nexus prayers to reach that number. However, the primary reason I’m so happy to have hit that marker is not because five thousand is the largest isogrammic³ number in the English language, but because it means that while on my nexus prayer journey over the past 1,453 days, I have spent almost 800 hours making a personal connection with God using nexus prayer. And surprisingly, most of those times of prayer were done in five-minute increments – the 5-minute nexus prayer.

So why am I writing about this milestone and sharing it with you here? The answer is because the most common excuse I frequently hear from people (Christians and non-Christians alike) about prayer in general and nexus prayer in particular is “I’m just too busy to stop and pray.” Of course, we all know that we make the time for the things that matter most to us – time for work, meals, sleep, romance, sporting events, recreation, television, social media, family time, and sometimes even church. What or, more importantly, who is missing in that litany of activities? God. God gives us twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week to use as we choose. I’m simply challenging all of us to prayerfully look at our daily lives – our schedules and action lists – and find a five-minute time slot at least once a day to just “be” with God in the quietude of nexus prayer. To listen to God’s still, small voice.

Five minutes doesn’t sound like much, but even a single five-minute nexus prayer once a day – every day – will provide you with more than 30 minutes spent in quality, one-on-one time with God each week. Do that twice a day and you just spent more than one hour with God that week. I encourage you to make this a part of your regular daily routine, leaving markers along the way, and before you know it you too will have 5,000 cairns of prayer – cairns that will continue to lead you to the heart of God. Cairns that will show others the Way.


NOTES & REFERENCE

1 Cairn | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

2 Appian Way | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

3 Terminus – Ancient Roman god of boundary markers. | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

4 Isograms| An isogram (also known as a “nonpattern word”) is a logological term for a word or phrase without a repeating letter. | Source: Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia.

5 Photo Credit: “Stones in Balance” by Bekir Dönmez on Unsplash | Public Domain via Unsplash | Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

6 Photo Credit: Design for a stained glass window with Terminus Hans Holbein | Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. Modified with permission – Nexus Prayer International,

7 Photo Credit: © Copyright 2018 Nexus Prayer Timer 5K by Allen Aaron White. | Used with permission Nexus Prayer International.

St. Francis of Assisi (1182-​1226)

“We should seek not so much to pray but to become prayer.” – St. Francis of Assisi


Image Credit | Saint Francis of Assisi
The oldest surviving depiction of Saint Francis is a fresco near the entrance of the Benedictine abbey of Subiaco, painted between March 1228 and March 1229. | In Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons and License Art Libre.

Nexus Prayer 9/11


NEXUS PRAYER 9/11
Remembering September 11, 2001

One thing is certain: with each passing year I remember less and less. But like most everyone else in America I suppose, I remember precisely what I was doing the morning of September 11, 2001.

And to the day, exactly seventeen years later, I find myself remembering and reliving the tragic events of 9/11 and again find myself turning on the television to watch the news coverage of the day, only this time instead of witnessing the live reporting related to the attack of The World Trade Center, it’s the memorial tributes being given to all those who were killed. Of the almost three thousand innocent people who died in the attacks at the World Trade Center in New York, the Pentagon, and near Shanksville, Pa., the youngest victim was a two-and-a-half-year-old child on Flight 175 and the oldest was an 85-year-old passenger on Flight 11.

A special memorial service commemorating the 17th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was held today at the 9/11 Memorial & Museum that included the reading aloud by family members the names of the 2,983 men, women and children who were killed, as well as six moments of silence – marked with the chime of bells the times at which the twin towers were struck, when they fell, and the moment of impact at the Pentagon and the crash of Flight 93. And as is done every year on the anniversary of 9/11, the Memorial Plaza is open to the public from 3 p.m. to midnight for the viewing of Tribute in Light.

Of course, the attack on the World Trade Center and other locations happened long before Nexus Prayer was even a thought. But as I paused this morning for the six specific minutes of silence that preceded the reading of the victim’s names, it seemed that the least I could do today would be to create and hold a special 9/11 nexus prayer of nine minutes and eleven seconds in memorium.

A special reading of Psalm 46 by President Barack Obama was done on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of 9/11. Should you also like to remember those who died, the thousands who were injured, the family members who lost a loved one, the survivors, and the first responders of 9/11 by pausing for prayer, you can find the special 9/11 nexus prayer timer settings here.


A PRAYER FOR PEACE ON THE ANIVERSARY OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2001
– After the Prayer of Saint Francis –

With all our heart and all our mind, we pray to you, O Lord:

Make us instruments of your peace.
For the peace of the world, that a spirit of respect and forbearance

may grow among nations and peoples, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is hatred, let us sow love.
For our enemies and those who wish us harm, especially those who are led to acts of terror; that in the aftermath of the destruction in New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington on September 11th, 2001 we may grow ever
more deeply in your spirit of justice and peace, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is injury, let us sow pardon.
For all who believe in you, Lord Christ, and all whose faith is known to you alone, that they may be delivered from the darkness of fanaticism that arises from poverty and oppression, and from the pride that arises from wealth and comfort, and brought into your light, so that divisions that foster violence may cease, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is discord, let us sow union.
For those who have lost their faith in you Lord God, for those who continue to mourn those who died in the World Trade Center, the airplanes and the Pentagon, may your Churchgive comfort and hope
in this time of remembrance, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is doubt, let us sow faith.
For all those whose spirit has been broken and whose lives have been irrevocably disrupted by the violence of that day and its aftermath, we offer our prayers along with the persecuted, the lonely, and the sick who have bid our prayers today, that they may be relieved and protected.

Where there is despair, let us sow hope.
For the mission and ministry of the Episcopal Church, especially in the Diocese of New York; that we may listen to the Gospel of reconciliation and proclaim it in word and action for the building of your reign
here on earth, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is darkness, let us sow light.
For all who died in the terror of September 2001 and for those others whom we remember today, for those who believed in your resurrection and those who knew not your promise of eternal life, in trust that they have been found by you and are at rest in your holy habitation, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is sadness, let us sow joy.
We pray for the concerns of our parish. And we pray for the forgiveness of our sins.

Grant that we may not so much seek to be consoled as to console;
to be understood, as to understand; to be loved as to love.
Take heart, in Christ we have been reconciled to God.

For it is in giving that we receive, it is in pardoning that we are pardoned;
and it is in dying that we reborn to eternal life.
Amen.


NOTES & REFERENCES

1 Official Website | National September 11 Memorial & Museum

2 Sept 11 Attacks Historical Overview |Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia.

3 A Proper for September 11 | A Prayer of Peace | The Episcopal Diocese of New York

4 Photo Credit: “Never Forget” tapestry at 911 Memorial in New York City| Original image by Billy Hathorn | Used and modified with permission via Creaive Commons license CC BY 3.0  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), from Wikimedia Commons.

President Barack Obama reads Psalm 46:1-11 including Psalm 46:10 to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center in New York, the Pentagon, and near Shanksville, Pa.

Read my personal journal entry honoring the 17th anniversary (September 11, 2018) of 9/11 here.

“Be still, and know that I am God.”

The White House
Office of the Press Secretary
For Immediate Release

Remarks by the President at the September 11th 10th Anniversary Commemoration

 

REMARKS BY PRESIDENT OBAMA AT THE NEW YORK CITY SEPTEMBER 11TH 10TH ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATION CEREMONY

National September 11th Memorial
New York City, New York

8:47 A.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:

God is our refuge and strength,
a very present help in trouble.
Therefore, we will not fear,
even though the earth be removed,
and though the mountains be carried
into the midst of the sea.
Though its waters roar and be troubled,
though the mountains shake
with its swelling,
there’s a river
whose streams shall make glad
the City of God,
the holy place of the Tabernacle
of the Most High.
God is in the midst of her.
She shall not be moved.
God shall help her
just at the break of dawn.
The nations raged,
the kingdoms were moved.
He uttered his voice.
The earth melted.
The Lord of Hosts is with us.
The God of Jacob is our refuge.
Come behold the works of the Lord
who has made desolations in the Earth.
He makes wars cease
to the ends of the Earth.
He breaks the bough
and cuts the spear in two.
He burns the chariot in fire.
Be still and know that I am God.
I will be exalted among the nations.
I will be exalted in the Earths.
The Lord of Hosts is with us.
The God of Jacob is our refuge.

NOTES & REFERENCES

1 President Obama reads Psalm 46 | 9/11 Memorial Service 10th Anniversary via YouTube

2 Remarks by President Obama | 9/11 10th Anniversary Commemoration via the White House Briefing Room

Invitation to Prayer

 A PERSONAL INVITE

Dear Friends,

Departing from a normal journal post today, it’s hard to believe that our humble nexus prayer group meeting at Saint Dunstan’s Episcopal Church (Houston) is already celebrating its 1st anniversary, but it’s true!

Over the past twelve months we have thoroughly examined Psalm 46, learned and practiced nexus prayer, and have made some life-long friendships. Thanks be to God! Now with Summer almost completely in our rear-view mirror, I hope you will consider this “open letter” your personal invitation from me to come join us for nexus prayer as we begin our Fall kick-off. Our Sunday morning gathering continues tomorrow morning (and every Sunday morning) at 10:15 in room #315 of St. Dunstan’s Bentley Educational Building as we begin our second year and new semester of prayer.

What’s new you might be asking? Everything! Well, almost. Although our fellowship time that includes coffee, tea, and biscotti remains the same, our group now has a new name (Nexus Prayer Circle), new format (more prayer, less talk), new and improved website (you’re feedback always welcome), and a new vision (sneak peek!) that will be explained here in detail in the weeks to come.

Below is an overview of our new class format. New to nexus prayer? Whether you come once, weekly, or anytime you are able, visitors are always welcome. I look forward to greeting all of you personally as we continue our pilgrimage of prayer by learning to “be still, and know that I am God” week after week through nexus prayer.

NEXUS PRAYER CIRCLE | FALL 2018
SAINT DUNSTAN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

MEETING TIME & PLACE
Sunday Mornings | 10:15 | BEC 315
Nexus Prayer Circle – Led by Allen White

DESCRIPTION
Deeply rooted in Psalm 46:10, Nexus Prayer is the biblically-based, contemplative prayer that both increases our awareness of God’s presence in our lives, and helps us to better hear God’s “still, small voice” in a busy and noisy world. Through our prayers, responsive readings, and lessons from Scripture, God is speaking; we are listening. Come pray with us in sacred silence.

SUNDAY SCHEDULE
Nexus Prayer Circle
10:15 – Fellowship (Conversation, tea, coffee, hand-crafted biscotti)
10:30 – Psalm 46 (Group responsive reading)
10:35 – Nexus Prayer (15 minutes of silent prayer; 5m of intercessory prayer)
10:55 – *Dismissal (For those attending the 11:00 Worship Service)

* Following class dismissal, all are welcome to linger a little longer for additional fellowship, coffee, and convo. A brief orientation and introduction to nexus prayer for visitors, as well as free brochures and helpful Nexus Prayer literature are always available immediately after class.

NOTES & REFERENCES

Photo Credit: Nexus Prayer Circle | © Copyright Allen Aaron White / Nexus Prayer International. Used with permission.

Photo by Matt Collamer | Used with Permission | Nexus Prayer International

“I have learned from St. Francis that where there is no involvement with human suffering, there is no following of God’s will.” ~ Murray Bodo

St. Francis joins Nexus Prayer

St. Francis of Assisi (1182-​1226)

JESUS, SAINT FRANCIS, & NEXUS PRAYER
A WINNING COMBINATION

So, today, Saint Francis joined Nexus Prayer. (Or did Nexus Prayer join St. Francis?) You decide. Either way, our mission is the same – trying to authentically live out the Gospel in our daily lives while sharing the love of Jesus with our generation.

Nexus prayer has been a part of my daily spiritual activities for more than three years now. During that time, God has been ever-so-slowly transforming me from the inside out as I’ve spent quality one-on-one time just listening to him in prayer. As a result, I believe I’m a kinder, gentler, and wiser version (he said humbly) of my former self. That’s not so surprising since I’m convinced that the more time we spend with Jesus, the more we become like Jesus.

But what has been surprising this year is my increased awareness of and interest in all things Franciscan. Perhaps I should not be so shocked by my attraction to Saint Francis as I’ve worn a San Damiano cross for over twenty years, and as mentioned elsewhere on this site, most of the spiritual mentors who have been busy planting seeds in my soul for years are all Franciscans – John Michael Talbot, Richard Rohr, and Murray Bodo to name just a few. I just never thought of myself actually becoming a Franciscan. Until now.

“The more time we spend with Jesus, the more we become like Jesus.”

The Franciscan vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, along with their companion values of simplicity, humility, harmony, compassion, service, and prayer all resonate with me. Those admirable qualities notwithstanding, there are several important reasons why I am compelled to embrace a Franciscan lifestyle today, and why I have been prayerfully discerning a call to a Franciscan vocation (Anglican or Secular Order) in the near future.

All of these Franciscan virtues (Jesus’ virtues really) will be explored in future posts to my journal. For now, however, suffice it to say that there are several important reasons I feel led by God to begin walking in this new direction…

THE DIVIDED STATES OF AMERICA
First, because perhaps like no other time in the history of our country (at least during my lifetime), many of our government leaders and people in our society (including Christians) seem to reflect the divided states, rather than the United States of America. Whether the issue is immigration, race, gun control, religion, gay rights, women’s rights, or the plethora of other human issues and societal ills, the current social and political climate have never been more polarizing. Us versus them.

THE NEED TO DO SOMETHING
Second, thanks to nexus prayer, I believe I am closer to God than ever before and clearly hear His call to be obedient to step forward as an advocate for all the disenfranchised and most vulnerable members of our society wherever I am able. I desire to be a voice of love, peace, and compassion in contrast to so many who are stoking the coals of hatred and the flames of bigotry and racism. I can’t do everything, but I can do something and believe it is my Christian responsibility to do so. James 4:17 This is just one reason why my wife works in the field of sex and human trafficking at Redeemed Ministries and why I’ve recently begun volunteering at the Hope Center – a ministry that serves the homeless men and women in the North Houston Area.

THE IMITATION OF CHRIST
Finally,  although I will never measure up to the examples of Jesus, Thomas á Kempis, and Saint Francis, I feel led to walk down this path today because I believe as Christians we are called…

  • To recognize the human dignity of every person as created in the image of God. Genesis 1:26-27 | Genesis 2:7
  • To be good stewards of our planet and take good care of God’s creation. Genesis 1:1-31
  • To share God’s unconditional love for all, and be a light in the darkness. John 3:16 | Matthew 22:36-40 | I John 4:7-12
  • To live the Gospel radically for “the least of these” Matthew 25:34-45 | Matthew 5:16
  • To be advocates for justice for the most vulnerable in our society: the poor, aged, sick, homeless, refugees, immigrants, and victims of sex and human trafficking. Isaiah 61:1 | Matthew 25:34-40
  • To be peacemakers. Matthew 5:9 | Matthew 5:11-17

Prayer is good. Nexus prayer is great. But as the Apostle James reminds us, “Faith without works is dead.” James 2:14-17 To this end, I’ve already taken baby steps in my life to be the hands, feet, and voice of Christ to my generation (more on this later), just as I believe Saint Francis did for his. In other words, the prayer usually attributed to Saint Francis has also become my prayer:

Lord Make Me an Instrument
Lord make me an instrument of your peace
Where there is hatred let me sow love
Where there is injury, pardon
Where there is doubt, faith
Where there is despair, hope
Where there is darkness, light
And where there is sadness, joy
O divine master grant that I may
not so much seek to be consoled as to console
to be understood as to understand
To be loved as to love
For it is in giving that we receive
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned
And it’s in dying that we are born to eternal life
Amen

Image Credit | Saint Francis of Assisi
The oldest surviving depiction of Saint Francis is a fresco near the entrance of the Benedictine abbey of Subiaco, painted between March 1228 and March 1229. | In Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons and License Art Libre.

Let Go, and Let God!

"Winter Road" © Copyright Erin Theisen Photography | Used with Permission | Nexus Prayer International

 

Although not explicitly stated in Psalm 46, there is an implicit promise that is made by God each and every time we pray through Psalm 46:10 using nexus prayer.

In essence, we learn from the metaphors used in Psalm 46 that whenever the storms and tsunamis of life come (and they will); when our enemies (or worse, THE enemy) attack us; when we are overwhelmed by our daily trials and tribulations; when the clamor, the tumult, and battles of life cause us to worry and fear; and like Job, even when we lose everything we hold dear – our family and friends, our wealth and health – it is then we are to remember as did Martin Luther¹

“God is our refuge and strength, an ever-present help in trouble. The Lord Almighty is with us;
the God of Jacob is our fortress.” Psalm 46: 1,7,11

But how does God perform His mightiest and miraculous work on our behalf? It is when we are still. Easier said than done, I know, but that is precisely the purpose and promise of nexus prayer, and why verse 10 is the pivotal verse of Psalm 46. It’s not what we do, but what God does. When we become still, our work ends and God’s work begins. Put another way using a very popular and often used expression, we are to “Let go, and let God!”

Not only do we see this principle at work in Psalm 46, but similarly in Exodus 14:13. You probably know the story well. The Jews, being led by Moses out of Egypt, were being pursued by Pharaoh’s army and wound up with their backs to the wall of the Red Sea with seemingly no way of escape. What was needed was Divine intervention. God’s solution? Run? Swim? Defend themselves by fighting back? No! God’s admonition to the children of Israel was to “Fear not, stand still, and see the salvation of the Lord.” In other words, do the opposite of what would seem common sense in the middle of those frightening circumstances – don’t be afraid, drop everything, stand still, and watch God deliver them from all of their enemies.

The same concept can be found in Psalm 27:7 where we are instructed to “Rest in the LORD, and wait patiently for him: fret not thyself because of him who prospereth in his way, because of the man who bringeth wicked devices to pass.” In other words, it is only by our patient waiting and resting in God that the Lord will ultimately deliver us from all evil and harm. We are not to worry, but rather wait. Not to work, but rest.

Finally, it was Jesus himself who promised in John 14:27 “Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.”

That promise that Jesus made to his disciples centuries ago is the same identical promise He makes to all of his followers today who are willing to be still through the praying of Psalm 46:10. For it is when we become still – still in body, soul, spirit, and mind – that we discover true inner peace. The kind of peace that “passes all understanding” and that can withstand any storm of life, but that God only provides when we are still in His presence. The stillness found through nexus prayer.

“And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.” Philippians 4:7

 

Ready to begin? Nexus prayer can be done in as little as five minutes a day and The Steps are easy to learn. Questions? Feel free to contact me anytime!

NOTES & CREDITS:

1 It was Martin Luther who composed the classic hymn, “A Mighty Fortress is Our God” (circa 1528), based on Psalm 46:1 and who sang it often whenever he felt overwhelmed by the persecutions and challenges of life.

2 “Winter Road” © 2016 Copyright Erin Theisen Photography | Used with Permission | Nexus Prayer International

Save

Save

 

“All of humanity’s problems stem from man’s inability to sit quietly in a room alone.” ~ Blaise Pascal, Pensées

Praying On the Go

 “Lawnmower” by Daniel Watson | Public Domain via Unsplash | Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

BE STILL & DO

Without question, the very best way to maximize the benefits and enjoy the experience of nexus prayer is to pray when we are still, quiet, and undistracted. Better still (no pun intended), is to practice nexus prayer in a sacred space.  Whether in an intimate chapel, a cathedral, a beautifully landscaped garden, or even sitting alone on a bench by a lake, there is something special, something holy about praying in a sacred space. But if you live a busy, multi-tasking, and all-too-often stressful life like mine, the opportunities to just “get away from it all” to some secluded spiritual oasis are few and far between. Besides, the Apostle Paul exhorts us as Christians to pray without ceasing for everything, everyone, and everywhere I Thessalonians 5:17, I Timothy 2:1-8. For these reasons, we must learn to pray nexus prayer during our ordinary, everyday lives but also while we are on the go.

“Ordinary Prayer” by Allen White | Copyright ©2017 Nexus Prayer International. All rights reserved.

Allen & Rugby take a 5 minute break from work for Nexus Prayer.

ORDINARY TIME
FOR PRAYER

We spend most of our time here on earth doing quite mundane, ordinary things with our time: eating, working, attending school, doing the dishes or laundry, gardening, and cooking to name just a few.

Interestingly, it is not a requirement, nor do we necessarily need to find special times or places (though it helps) for prayer in our life. That’s because there are dozens, maybe even hundreds of opportunities in our lives every single day for prayer in general, and nexus prayer in particular. For example, because my schedule permits it today, I’m going to stop what I’m doing right now (writing this post) and do a 5 minute nexus prayer. (Be right back.) Done!

Likewise, although I awaken every morning at 5am for special, uninterrupted nexus prayer before beginning my day, I routinely pray nexus prayer every time I mow the lawn. After all, cutting grass is a pretty mindless activity.  Try it and you’ll see that you can perform a 5 minute or even a 20 minute nexus prayer while mowing, gardening, pulling weeds, or almost any outdoor activity.¹ If you want to learn how to pray on the spiritual mountain tops, you first need to learn how to pray on terra firma. So, after we turn off the TV, we shouldn’t have to look too hard or too far to find a few minutes for prayer right there under our nose.

BE STILL … AND GO!

No, that’s not an oxymoron. It’s a fact. Ours is a very mobile generation. Setting aside for the moment how much time we spend on our mobile phones and devices, American drivers spend an average of 17,600 minutes behind the wheel of their car each year.² That being so, why not put that enormous block of time to work? Or to prayer? Between errands, church, commute time to and from work, appointments, shopping, and more, we spend a lot of time going places in our vehicles. So why not make your car or truck a vehicle for prayer? I call it praying with my eyes wide open. Add to that the time we spend waiting in line for a drivers’ license, making bank deposits, fast food drive thrus, and the like, and the time adds up quickly. Wasted time? Not much in my life nowadays as I typically use those 5, 10, and 15 minute waits in line at the post office and pharmacy drive thru for nexus prayer.

Don’t have time to pray? Think again. In fact, why not pray right now? Nexus prayer can be done in as little as five minutes a day and The Steps are easy to learn. Questions? Feel free to contact me anytime!

NOTES & CREDITS

1 Be Still & Do | Like being still and praying while on the go, this appears to be an oxymoron. It is unusual I admit. However, Nexus Prayer is first and foremost just “BE-ing” with, listening to God. It is a conversation with God doing most of the talking. We multitask and have conversations with others all the time in our daily lives. Why not with Nexus Prayer?

2 American Driving Habits | AAA Report, September 8, 2016 | American Automobile Association

3 Photo Credit: “Lawnmower” by Daniel Watson | Public Domain via Unsplash | Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

4 Photo Credit: “Ordinary Prayer” by Allen White | Copyright ©2017  Nexus Prayer International. All rights reserved.

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