Nexus Prayer Journal

Photo by Mikhail Pavstyuk | Public domain photo used and modified by permission via Unsplash. | Nexus Prayer International.

 

Welcome to my journal! Here you will find my personal ruminations, journal entries, and experiences with nexus prayer…and more.

Although I add new entries, practical tips, and suggestions for improving your nexus prayer practice regularly, much of the content you will find here is taken directly from my original observations and notebooks of 2015 while conducting my one year (365 consecutive days) of research, intensive study, and development of Nexus Prayer.

In addition, here you will also find my occasional commentary on current events, Franciscan spirituality, church history, and other forms of prayer.

“We hear God best when we are still and silent.”

It is my sincerest prayer that by sharing my personal insights about nexus prayer and other spiritual topics here, that you, also, will come to discover not only a deeper communion with Jesus Christ, but experience the unconditional love of God and the “peace of God that passes all understanding” that can be yours through the quietude of nexus prayer. After all, we hear God best when we are still and silent.

 “Be still, and know that I am God.” Psalm 46:10

Tired of reading? Ready to begin? Nexus prayer can be done in as little as five minutes a day and The Steps are easy to learn. Questions? Feel free to contact me anytime!

NOTES & CREDITS

Original Photo Credit: Books photoby Mikail Pavstyuk in Public Domain used and modified by permission via Unsplash. | Nexus Prayer International.

A core lesson of nexus prayer is to “be still” (let go, and let God). The Apostle Paul said as much: “Brethren, I count not myself to have apprehended: but this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before…” Philippians 3:13,14

Little Poor Man’s Fresh Catch

New additions to The Little Poor Man’s Library of Saint Francis arrive just about every week, with six new catches “fresh off the boat” added today alone.

These new books cover the 800th Anniversary of St. Francis, the San Damiano Cross, The Rule & Testament of Saint Francis, and a brief history of Franciscanism, and include:

  • The Crucifix that Spoke to St. Francis by Michael Goonan
  • Saint Francis of Assisi by John R. H. Moorman
  • Francis and the San Damiano Cross by Susan Saint Sing, PhD
  • The Rule & Testament of St. Francis by Kajetan Esser, O.F.M.
  • Francis of Assisi: A Revolutionary Life by Adrian House
  • The Francis Book: 800 Years with the Saint from Assisi by Roy M. Gasnick

All of these books are currently on the shelves and ready to be checked out at The Little Poor Man’s Library of Saint Francis, along with these other wonderful titles.  Questions? As always, feel free to contact me anytime.

 

 

 


Photo Credits: “A Resolve for Every Morning of the New Year” from a vintage, 1909 Calendar by Bishop John H. Vincent. In public domain via Wikipedia and modified one hundred and ten years later by Nexus Prayer International.

Resolved: More Prayer

Photo by NordWood Themes. Modified and used with permission by Nexus Prayer via Unsplash

Before highlighting a few of the resolutions I’ve made for Nexus Prayer and myself for the New Year, let’s take a quick look at last year and the resolutions currently trending in the United States for 2019  according to Inc. (Thank you, Statista!)Infographic: The Top New Year's Resolutions For 2019 | Statista You will find more infographics at Statista

Notice anything missing? As in previous years, you’ll find no resolutions (less than 10%) to spend more time with God through increased church attendance, Scripture reading, or prayer among Americans priorities. No surprise there. Equally unsurprising is that prayer in general, and nexus prayer in particular, are both at the top of my New Year’s resolution list. As promised, here are a few personal goals and plans for Nexus Prayer in 2019:

  • Nexus Prayer – Since Nexus Prayer was first launched in 2015, I have gradually succeeded in increasing the amount of time I spend daily in nexus prayer and I plan on continuing that trend for 2019. Although my daily goal will remain at one hour, my average for the last three years has been 30 minutes. That works out to 5,359 sessions; 1,570 days; 803 total hours, with an average of 3.4 sessions per day. I’m not bragging here. To the contrary, I wish I could pray more. But what’s worth mentioning is that the vast majority of that time spent connecting to God through nexus prayer was done in five minute prayer sessions! That’s 803 hours spent with God in prayer five minutes at a time. It adds up!
  • Intercessory Prayer – Likewise, I’m increasing my daily intercessory prayer time – time used praying for the needs of others in 2019. This includes praying for family, friends, the nexus prayer circle, my parish, various ministries, my fellow brothers at the Order of Saint Francis, my community, our country (God bless America!), and too many other individuals, churches, and organizations to list here by name.
  • Book Projects  – Although work on my first book on nexus prayer got off to a good start in 2018, I intend to have it completed and released before year-end. In addition, I have begun work on  a second book focusing on the history and symbolism of the San Damiano Cross (the cross of Saint Francis). Most of this research and writing will continue this year with my weekly visits to The Lanier Theological Library,
  • Franciscan Formation – As many of you know, I was accepted as a Candidate with The Order of Saint Francis (Anglican) last Fall when my formation to become a Franciscan friar was begun in earnest. The process continues this year, culminating in June when I will travel to Wisconsin to take my temporary vows as a Postulant.
  • Nexus Prayer Circle – Our local nexus prayer circle that meets every Sunday at Saint Dunstan’s Episcopal Church has continued to grow and flourish.  I pray for God’s continued blessings on the members of this group, while also doing all I can to help grow the prayer group that has formed at the 1960 Hope Center and meets every Friday at 12:30pm.
  • Advocacy – My volunteer work as an advocate for “the least of these” will continue this year focusing on the elderly, homeless, victims of human and sex trafficking, as well as immigrants and refugees. I also hope to become involved in preserving God’s Creation by learning more about climate change, global warming, and taking better care of our environment.
  • Personal – My plethora of personal goals for 2019 are too many to mention (all according to God’s will of course), but include: learning to live debt free, living more intentionally, eating better, serving more in my local parish, reducing clutter, getting more organized, being a better husband, father, friend, and continuing to perfect my biscotti recipe!

And what about you? What dreams do you dare to dream? What goals has God given you? How will you stretch, grow, serve, and love both God and your neighbor in 2019? What audacious projects will you take on in the coming year? Only you and God know the answers to those questions, but whatever your resolutions, my prayers are with you. However, know this: the answer is ultimately found in Matthew 6:33.

“But seek you first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness;
and all these things will be added unto you.”


NOTES & REFERENCES

1 The Top New Year’s Resolutions for 2019 | Statista and Inc. Magazine

2 Photo Credit: Happy New Year 2019 by NordWood Themes in Public Domain via Unsplash | Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

Remembering Thomas Keating

Fr. Thomas Keating, (1923-2018)

REMEMBERING THOMAS KEATING
Father Thomas Keating, O.C.S.O.
7 March 1923 – 25 October 2018
Requiescat In Pace


Editor’s Note: Father Thomas Keating¹, Co-Founder of centering prayer and a pioneer in contemplative prayer, Christian spirituality, and interfaith dialogue died yesterday, October 25, 2018, at age 95.

It was at one of his lectures back in 1998 that Fr. Keating set me on the contemplative path and introduced me to centering prayer. And because his teaching and writing have had such a profound influence on me over the years, I feel a deep, personal loss. Fr. Keating may no longer be with us physically, but there is no doubt in my mind that his ministry and spiritual legacy will continue until the end of time. May he rest in peace.



BIOGRAPHY

Born in New York City in 1923, Thomas Keating attended Deerfield Academy, Yale University, and Fordham University, where he graduated in December 1943. He entered the Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (also known as Trappists) in Valley Falls, Rhode Island, in January 1944. He was appointed Superior of St. Benedict’s Monastery, Snowmass, Colorado, in 1958, and was elected abbot of St. Joseph’s Abbey, Spencer, Massachusetts, in 1961. He returned to Snowmass after retiring as abbot of Spencer in 1981, where he established a program with retreats in the practice of Centering Prayer, a contemporary form of the Christian contemplative tradition through the auspices of Contemplative Outreach.²

LOCALLY
I remember it like it was yesterday. While serving a local Baptist church as associate pastor back in 1998, I received a sign from God. Well, in a manner of speaking. As I recall, it was a tiny classified ad in the Houston Chronicle’s Religion Section that, at first glance, appeared to be either a typo or an oxymoron announcing that a Trappist monk would be speaking at a Baptist church. As it turned out, the ad was legit. The church was River Oaks Baptist Church. The monk? Also, legit – Thomas Keating.

Intrigued, I attended Father Keating’s lecture on prayer that evening where he stood front and center on the stage, his hands gently folded as in in prayer, speaking for about ninety minutes without the use of a podium or notes. He spoke both extemporaneously and compellingly to a packed-out church on the importance of taking the time out of our busy daily lives and schedules to make a connection with God. (Keating likened it to sending God many short emails throughout the day. Today we would just text or FaceTime God.) To my ears, it sounded like a Christian version of meditation; he referred to it as centering prayer. I left the church that night in amazement of what I had just heard with a well-fed soul, an armful of Keating’s books, and a commitment to God to learn more. And learn more I did during the next several years through his lectures, more than 40 books and videos, and dozens of centering prayer and silent prayer retreats I participated in at Villa de Matel, in Houston.

LEGACY
Today, with more than twenty years having now passed since my introduction to Christian “meditation” (thank you, Fr. Keating), I’m now the one standing in front of people teaching and spreading the “good news” of contemplative prayer.  And along with thousands of other disciples and people all over the world, I express my appreciation for the profound influence of Father Keating on my life and give thanks to God for the enormous spiritual legacy he has left behind for generations to come.


 NOTES & REFERENCES

1 R.I.P. Father Thomas Keating | National Catholic Reporter (NCR)

2 Thomas Keating Bio | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

3 Photo Credit: Fr. Thomas Keating | Public Domain by Christopher [CC BY 2.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

I’m a Candidate. Vote!

I’M A CANDIDATE!
Once again it is election time in America. Pray for me because I am now a candidate. A candidate for what you may ask? Please continue reading…

UNITED STATES MIDTERM ELECTIONS
Yes, at the time of this writing, midterm elections are exactly two weeks from today with the million-dollar question being: “Who will control the House and the Senate?” once the last ballot has been cast and the votes tallied. Of course, as Christians, I believe it is our daily duty to pray for our President, elected leaders, and our country…and I do. But over the next two weeks we must prayerfully consider the candidates, their proposed policies and platforms, then GO VOTE!¹ The results? Only God knows. But something else that only God and a few select individuals know is that I, too, am now a candidate, but not the kind you may be thinking of. Please let me explain.

CANDIDATE ALLEN
As many of you know, for more than twenty-five years I have considered myself a contemplative Christian with a heart for prayer (which is partially responsible for the birth of Nexus Prayer.) I am also very active in my local parish and serve as an advocate for various local causes in my community and beyond. But following a season of prayer this past January, I heard God calling me to deeper waters by joining a religious order and making vows dedicating myself to serve the most vulnerable of our society. Yes, I am already heavily involved at church, and in teaching, and sharing nexus prayer wherever I can, but I believed God was inviting me to a higher calling – a calling to a vocation that took into consideration the needs of “the least of these” – especially with all that is happening on the political and social fronts of America today. Us versus them. Matthew 25:40-45

MONK OR FRIAR?
That part was easy. I desire to serve. The hard part was narrowing down what “kind” of religious order would be the best match for me and me for them. Generally speaking, friars are different from monks in that they are called to live the evangelical counsels (vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience) in service to society, rather than through cloistered asceticism and devotion. Whereas monks live in a self-sufficient community, friars work among laypeople and are supported by donations or other charitable support. A monk or nun make their vows and commits to a particular community in a particular place. Friars are often part of a dispersed community (a monastery without walls as I like to think of it.) Friars may also commit to a community spread across a wider geographical area known as a province, and so they will typically move around, spending time in different houses of the community within their province.²

St. Francis of Assisi (1182-​1226)

BROTHER CANDIDATE: A FRIAR IN FORMATION
When it came to my personal decision, dozens of orders were considered, but God helped me narrow it to two: the Benedictines and the Franciscans – the first known for their dedication to prayer, silence, and solitude (a good match for me) and the latter known for both their prayer life and service. The Benedictines serving God within the confines of the cloistered monastic walls (monks), and the Franciscans serving both God and man outside the same walls (friars) – even helping tear down the walls of intolerance, hatred, injustice, bigotry, racism, poverty, and more. In the end, God showed me that the Franciscans and Franciscan Spirituality were the path and The Way God intended for me. But then… which Franciscan order?

Since the time that Saint Francis founded his first order of brothers some 800 years ago (The Friars Minor, OFM, or the Lesser Brothers as they are sometimes called), many diverse Franciscan orders with different charisms have emerged in both the Roman Catholic Church, as well as orders of friars (and sisters) that exist in other Christian traditions, including the Order of Lutheran Franciscans, the Order of Ecumenical Franciscans and the Order of Lesser Sisters and Brothers.

In the Anglican Communion there are also a number of mendicant groups such as the Anglican Friars Preachers, The Society of St. Francis, and the Order of Saint Francis. It is this last (but certainly not the least) order, The Order of Saint Francis,³ that has both accepted me as a candidate and placed me in formal formation.

The Order of Saint Francis 2018 Convocation | Photo Copyright ©2012 in perpetuity by Order of Saint Francis (OSF). All Rights Reserved. Used with permission.

ORDER OF SAINT FRANCIS
As a contemporary expression of Franciscan tradition within the Anglican Communion, the Order of Saint Francis is unique among other Franciscan orders. That’s because although it is an active, Apostolic Christian religious order within the Anglican Communion and in communion with the See of Canterbury, it is not based in an enclosed communal setting, Instead, OSF brothers live independently in different parts of the world, with ministries based on the needs of their local communities. Members are baptized men who have been confirmed within the Anglican Communion who voluntarily commit to live by a set of professed vows for a term of years or for life. Like all Franciscan orders, every OSF Brother continues his spiritual pilgrimage under formation within the order regardless of their status: candidate, postulant, novitiate, professed, or life professed. The order was founded in 2003 by Br Nicholas Kis and is currently blessed to have about 40 vowed brothers serving Christ across the world.³

Needless to say, although I am quite humbled and joyful about this exciting development and personal transition, there is much more to share, and I will do so here soon. I certainly would appreciate your prayers. But for now, … GO VOTE!

NOTES & REFERENCES

1 GO VOTE | League of Women Voters of Texas (Non-Partisan)

2 Monk or Friar | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

3 Order of Saint Francis | OSF Summary Content Copyright ©2012  in perpetuity by Order of St. Francis (OSF). All Rights Reserved. Used by Nexus Prayer International with express written permission of the Order of Saint Francis.

4 Photo Credit: “I Voted” by Parker Johnson via Unsplash in Public Domain. |Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

6 Photo Credit: Saint Francis of Assisi |The oldest surviving depiction of Saint Francis is a fresco near the entrance of the Benedictine abbey of Subiaco, painted between March 1228 and March 1229. | In Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons and License Art Libre.

7 Photo Credit: Order of Saint Francis 2018 Convocation | OSF Photo Copyright ©2012  in perpetuity by Order of St. Francis (OSF). All Rights Reserved. Photo used by Nexus Prayer International with express written permission of the Order of Saint Francis.

Cairns of Prayer

CAIRNS OF PRAYER

I recently reached a new milestone and marked it with another cairn. A cairn of nexus prayer. A cairn on my prayer timer.

Cairns¹, from the Scottish Gaelic: càrn, are human-made piles of stones that have been used from prehistoric times and that are still being used today for many and varied purposes, including landmarks, milestones, monument markers, and sometimes for ceremonial purposes such as identifying a famous gravesite or significant battle ground. For example, cairns or milestones were used to mark key distances and landmarks along the Appian Way² (Rome’s oldest road), and are still used today to indicate important or dangerous paths along remote jungle, densely forested, or mountainous areas such as some of the trails I’ve hiked leading to a few sacred spaces in Switzerland. Interestingly, for centuries historical monument markers were so prolific in Europe that in ancient Roman religion the Romans even had their own god, Terminus³, whose sole purpose was the protection of boundary markers. Of course, in everyday circumstances from the time we enter this world to the time we depart it, the term “milestone” is used in more casual ways to mark special occasions along our journey in this life such as the birth of a child, graduation, an engagement or marriage, job promotion, or significant awards and achievements.

All of that said, and as mentioned earlier, I have a personal cairn of my own to share – a cairn of prayer. Please know this is no humblebrag (though it’s true I’m both happy and humbled), but just last week I surpassed the 5,000 mark for completed individual nexus prayers. Sure, there’s good reason to celebrate because, after all, it took me the better part of three years of multiple daily nexus prayers to reach that number. However, the primary reason I’m so happy to have hit that marker is not because five thousand is the largest isogrammic³ number in the English language, but because it means that while on my nexus prayer journey over the past 1,453 days, I have spent almost 800 hours making a personal connection with God using nexus prayer. And surprisingly, most of those times of prayer were done in five-minute increments – the 5-minute nexus prayer.

So why am I writing about this milestone and sharing it with you here? The answer is because the most common excuse I frequently hear from people (Christians and non-Christians alike) about prayer in general and nexus prayer in particular is “I’m just too busy to stop and pray.” Of course, we all know that we make the time for the things that matter most to us – time for work, meals, sleep, romance, sporting events, recreation, television, social media, family time, and sometimes even church. What or, more importantly, who is missing in that litany of activities? God. God gives us twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week to use as we choose. I’m simply challenging all of us to prayerfully look at our daily lives – our schedules and action lists – and find a five-minute time slot at least once a day to just “be” with God in the quietude of nexus prayer. To listen to God’s still, small voice.

Five minutes doesn’t sound like much, but even a single five-minute nexus prayer once a day – every day – will provide you with more than 30 minutes spent in quality, one-on-one time with God each week. Do that twice a day and you just spent more than one hour with God that week. I encourage you to make this a part of your regular daily routine, leaving markers along the way, and before you know it you too will have 5,000 cairns of prayer – cairns that will continue to lead you to the heart of God. Cairns that will show others the Way.


NOTES & REFERENCE

1 Cairn | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

2 Appian Way | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

3 Terminus – Ancient Roman god of boundary markers. | Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia

4 Isograms| An isogram (also known as a “nonpattern word”) is a logological term for a word or phrase without a repeating letter. | Source: Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia.

5 Photo Credit: “Stones in Balance” by Bekir Dönmez on Unsplash | Public Domain via Unsplash | Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

6 Photo Credit: Design for a stained glass window with Terminus Hans Holbein | Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. Modified with permission – Nexus Prayer International,

7 Photo Credit: © Copyright 2018 Nexus Prayer Timer 5K by Allen Aaron White. | Used with permission Nexus Prayer International.

St. Francis of Assisi (1182-​1226)

“We should seek not so much to pray but to become prayer.” – St. Francis of Assisi


Image Credit | Saint Francis of Assisi
The oldest surviving depiction of Saint Francis is a fresco near the entrance of the Benedictine abbey of Subiaco, painted between March 1228 and March 1229. | In Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons and License Art Libre.

Nexus Prayer 9/11


NEXUS PRAYER 9/11
Remembering September 11, 2001

One thing is certain: with each passing year I remember less and less. But like most everyone else in America I suppose, I remember precisely what I was doing the morning of September 11, 2001.

And to the day, exactly seventeen years later, I find myself remembering and reliving the tragic events of 9/11 and again find myself turning on the television to watch the news coverage of the day, only this time instead of witnessing the live reporting related to the attack of The World Trade Center, it’s the memorial tributes being given to all those who were killed. Of the almost three thousand innocent people who died in the attacks at the World Trade Center in New York, the Pentagon, and near Shanksville, Pa., the youngest victim was a two-and-a-half-year-old child on Flight 175 and the oldest was an 85-year-old passenger on Flight 11.

A special memorial service commemorating the 17th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was held today at the 9/11 Memorial & Museum that included the reading aloud by family members the names of the 2,983 men, women and children who were killed, as well as six moments of silence – marked with the chime of bells the times at which the twin towers were struck, when they fell, and the moment of impact at the Pentagon and the crash of Flight 93. And as is done every year on the anniversary of 9/11, the Memorial Plaza is open to the public from 3 p.m. to midnight for the viewing of Tribute in Light.

Of course, the attack on the World Trade Center and other locations happened long before Nexus Prayer was even a thought. But as I paused this morning for the six specific minutes of silence that preceded the reading of the victim’s names, it seemed that the least I could do today would be to create and hold a special 9/11 nexus prayer of nine minutes and eleven seconds in memorium.

A special reading of Psalm 46 by President Barack Obama was done on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of 9/11. Should you also like to remember those who died, the thousands who were injured, the family members who lost a loved one, the survivors, and the first responders of 9/11 by pausing for prayer, you can find the special 9/11 nexus prayer timer settings here.


A PRAYER FOR PEACE ON THE ANIVERSARY OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2001
– After the Prayer of Saint Francis –

With all our heart and all our mind, we pray to you, O Lord:

Make us instruments of your peace.
For the peace of the world, that a spirit of respect and forbearance

may grow among nations and peoples, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is hatred, let us sow love.
For our enemies and those who wish us harm, especially those who are led to acts of terror; that in the aftermath of the destruction in New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington on September 11th, 2001 we may grow ever
more deeply in your spirit of justice and peace, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is injury, let us sow pardon.
For all who believe in you, Lord Christ, and all whose faith is known to you alone, that they may be delivered from the darkness of fanaticism that arises from poverty and oppression, and from the pride that arises from wealth and comfort, and brought into your light, so that divisions that foster violence may cease, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is discord, let us sow union.
For those who have lost their faith in you Lord God, for those who continue to mourn those who died in the World Trade Center, the airplanes and the Pentagon, may your Churchgive comfort and hope
in this time of remembrance, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is doubt, let us sow faith.
For all those whose spirit has been broken and whose lives have been irrevocably disrupted by the violence of that day and its aftermath, we offer our prayers along with the persecuted, the lonely, and the sick who have bid our prayers today, that they may be relieved and protected.

Where there is despair, let us sow hope.
For the mission and ministry of the Episcopal Church, especially in the Diocese of New York; that we may listen to the Gospel of reconciliation and proclaim it in word and action for the building of your reign
here on earth, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is darkness, let us sow light.
For all who died in the terror of September 2001 and for those others whom we remember today, for those who believed in your resurrection and those who knew not your promise of eternal life, in trust that they have been found by you and are at rest in your holy habitation, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is sadness, let us sow joy.
We pray for the concerns of our parish. And we pray for the forgiveness of our sins.

Grant that we may not so much seek to be consoled as to console;
to be understood, as to understand; to be loved as to love.
Take heart, in Christ we have been reconciled to God.

For it is in giving that we receive, it is in pardoning that we are pardoned;
and it is in dying that we reborn to eternal life.
Amen.


NOTES & REFERENCES

1 Official Website | National September 11 Memorial & Museum

2 Sept 11 Attacks Historical Overview |Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia.

3 A Proper for September 11 | A Prayer of Peace | The Episcopal Diocese of New York

4 Photo Credit: “Never Forget” tapestry at 911 Memorial in New York City| Original image by Billy Hathorn | Used and modified with permission via Creaive Commons license CC BY 3.0  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), from Wikimedia Commons.

President Barack Obama reads Psalm 46:1-11 including Psalm 46:10 to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center in New York, the Pentagon, and near Shanksville, Pa.

Read my personal journal entry honoring the 17th anniversary (September 11, 2018) of 9/11 here.

“Be still, and know that I am God.”

The White House
Office of the Press Secretary
For Immediate Release

Remarks by the President at the September 11th 10th Anniversary Commemoration

 

REMARKS BY PRESIDENT OBAMA AT THE NEW YORK CITY SEPTEMBER 11TH 10TH ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATION CEREMONY

National September 11th Memorial
New York City, New York

8:47 A.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:

God is our refuge and strength,
a very present help in trouble.
Therefore, we will not fear,
even though the earth be removed,
and though the mountains be carried
into the midst of the sea.
Though its waters roar and be troubled,
though the mountains shake
with its swelling,
there’s a river
whose streams shall make glad
the City of God,
the holy place of the Tabernacle
of the Most High.
God is in the midst of her.
She shall not be moved.
God shall help her
just at the break of dawn.
The nations raged,
the kingdoms were moved.
He uttered his voice.
The earth melted.
The Lord of Hosts is with us.
The God of Jacob is our refuge.
Come behold the works of the Lord
who has made desolations in the Earth.
He makes wars cease
to the ends of the Earth.
He breaks the bough
and cuts the spear in two.
He burns the chariot in fire.
Be still and know that I am God.
I will be exalted among the nations.
I will be exalted in the Earths.
The Lord of Hosts is with us.
The God of Jacob is our refuge.

NOTES & REFERENCES

1 President Obama reads Psalm 46 | 9/11 Memorial Service 10th Anniversary via YouTube

2 Remarks by President Obama | 9/11 10th Anniversary Commemoration via the White House Briefing Room

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