Tag: Saint Francis

Little Poor Man’s Fresh Catch

New additions to The Little Poor Man’s Library of Saint Francis arrive just about every week, with six new catches “fresh off the boat” added today alone.

These new books cover the 800th Anniversary of St. Francis, the San Damiano Cross, The Rule & Testament of Saint Francis, and a brief history of Franciscanism, and include:

  • The Crucifix that Spoke to St. Francis by Michael Goonan
  • Saint Francis of Assisi by John R. H. Moorman
  • Francis and the San Damiano Cross by Susan Saint Sing, PhD
  • The Rule & Testament of St. Francis by Kajetan Esser, O.F.M.
  • Francis of Assisi: A Revolutionary Life by Adrian House
  • The Francis Book: 800 Years with the Saint from Assisi by Roy M. Gasnick

All of these books are currently on the shelves and ready to be checked out at The Little Poor Man’s Library of Saint Francis, along with these other wonderful titles.  Questions? As always, feel free to contact me anytime.

 

 

Resolved: More Prayer

Photo by NordWood Themes. Modified and used with permission by Nexus Prayer via Unsplash

Before highlighting a few of the resolutions I’ve made for Nexus Prayer and myself for the New Year, let’s take a quick look at last year and the resolutions currently trending in the United States for 2019  according to Inc. (Thank you, Statista!)Infographic: The Top New Year's Resolutions For 2019 | Statista You will find more infographics at Statista

Notice anything missing? As in previous years, you’ll find no resolutions (less than 10%) to spend more time with God through increased church attendance, Scripture reading, or prayer among Americans priorities. No surprise there. Equally unsurprising is that prayer in general, and nexus prayer in particular, are both at the top of my New Year’s resolution list. As promised, here are a few personal goals and plans for Nexus Prayer in 2019:

  • Nexus Prayer – Since Nexus Prayer was first launched in 2015, I have gradually succeeded in increasing the amount of time I spend daily in nexus prayer and I plan on continuing that trend for 2019. Although my daily goal will remain at one hour, my average for the last three years has been 30 minutes. That works out to 5,359 sessions; 1,570 days; 803 total hours, with an average of 3.4 sessions per day. I’m not bragging here. To the contrary, I wish I could pray more. But what’s worth mentioning is that the vast majority of that time spent connecting to God through nexus prayer was done in five minute prayer sessions! That’s 803 hours spent with God in prayer five minutes at a time. It adds up!
  • Intercessory Prayer – Likewise, I’m increasing my daily intercessory prayer time – time used praying for the needs of others in 2019. This includes praying for family, friends, the nexus prayer circle, my parish, various ministries, my fellow brothers at the Order of Saint Francis, my community, our country (God bless America!), and too many other individuals, churches, and organizations to list here by name.
  • Book Projects  – Although work on my first book on nexus prayer got off to a good start in 2018, I intend to have it completed and released before year-end. In addition, I have begun work on  a second book focusing on the history and symbolism of the San Damiano Cross (the cross of Saint Francis). Most of this research and writing will continue this year with my weekly visits to The Lanier Theological Library,
  • Franciscan Formation – As many of you know, I was accepted as a Candidate with The Order of Saint Francis (Anglican) last Fall when my formation to become a Franciscan friar was begun in earnest. The process continues this year, culminating in June when I will travel to Wisconsin to take my temporary vows as a Postulant.
  • Nexus Prayer Circle – Our local nexus prayer circle that meets every Sunday at Saint Dunstan’s Episcopal Church has continued to grow and flourish.  I pray for God’s continued blessings on the members of this group, while also doing all I can to help grow the prayer group that has formed at the 1960 Hope Center and meets every Friday at 12:30pm.
  • Advocacy – My volunteer work as an advocate for “the least of these” will continue this year focusing on the elderly, homeless, victims of human and sex trafficking, as well as immigrants and refugees. I also hope to become involved in preserving God’s Creation by learning more about climate change, global warming, and taking better care of our environment.
  • Personal – My plethora of personal goals for 2019 are too many to mention (all according to God’s will of course), but include: learning to live debt free, living more intentionally, eating better, serving more in my local parish, reducing clutter, getting more organized, being a better husband, father, friend, and continuing to perfect my biscotti recipe!

And what about you? What dreams do you dare to dream? What goals has God given you? How will you stretch, grow, serve, and love both God and your neighbor in 2019? What audacious projects will you take on in the coming year? Only you and God know the answers to those questions, but whatever your resolutions, my prayers are with you. However, know this: the answer is ultimately found in Matthew 6:33.

“But seek you first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness;
and all these things will be added unto you.”


NOTES & REFERENCES

1 The Top New Year’s Resolutions for 2019 | Statista and Inc. Magazine

2 Photo Credit: Happy New Year 2019 by NordWood Themes in Public Domain via Unsplash | Used and modified with permission by Nexus Prayer International.

Nexus Prayer 9/11


NEXUS PRAYER 9/11
Remembering September 11, 2001

One thing is certain: with each passing year I remember less and less. But like most everyone else in America I suppose, I remember precisely what I was doing the morning of September 11, 2001.

And to the day, exactly seventeen years later, I find myself remembering and reliving the tragic events of 9/11 and again find myself turning on the television to watch the news coverage of the day, only this time instead of witnessing the live reporting related to the attack of The World Trade Center, it’s the memorial tributes being given to all those who were killed. Of the almost three thousand innocent people who died in the attacks at the World Trade Center in New York, the Pentagon, and near Shanksville, Pa., the youngest victim was a two-and-a-half-year-old child on Flight 175 and the oldest was an 85-year-old passenger on Flight 11.

A special memorial service commemorating the 17th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was held today at the 9/11 Memorial & Museum that included the reading aloud by family members the names of the 2,983 men, women and children who were killed, as well as six moments of silence – marked with the chime of bells the times at which the twin towers were struck, when they fell, and the moment of impact at the Pentagon and the crash of Flight 93. And as is done every year on the anniversary of 9/11, the Memorial Plaza is open to the public from 3 p.m. to midnight for the viewing of Tribute in Light.

Of course, the attack on the World Trade Center and other locations happened long before Nexus Prayer was even a thought. But as I paused this morning for the six specific minutes of silence that preceded the reading of the victim’s names, it seemed that the least I could do today would be to create and hold a special 9/11 nexus prayer of nine minutes and eleven seconds in memorium.

A special reading of Psalm 46 by President Barack Obama was done on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of 9/11. Should you also like to remember those who died, the thousands who were injured, the family members who lost a loved one, the survivors, and the first responders of 9/11 by pausing for prayer, you can find the special 9/11 nexus prayer timer settings here.


A PRAYER FOR PEACE ON THE ANIVERSARY OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2001
– After the Prayer of Saint Francis –

With all our heart and all our mind, we pray to you, O Lord:

Make us instruments of your peace.
For the peace of the world, that a spirit of respect and forbearance

may grow among nations and peoples, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is hatred, let us sow love.
For our enemies and those who wish us harm, especially those who are led to acts of terror; that in the aftermath of the destruction in New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington on September 11th, 2001 we may grow ever
more deeply in your spirit of justice and peace, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is injury, let us sow pardon.
For all who believe in you, Lord Christ, and all whose faith is known to you alone, that they may be delivered from the darkness of fanaticism that arises from poverty and oppression, and from the pride that arises from wealth and comfort, and brought into your light, so that divisions that foster violence may cease, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is discord, let us sow union.
For those who have lost their faith in you Lord God, for those who continue to mourn those who died in the World Trade Center, the airplanes and the Pentagon, may your Churchgive comfort and hope
in this time of remembrance, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is doubt, let us sow faith.
For all those whose spirit has been broken and whose lives have been irrevocably disrupted by the violence of that day and its aftermath, we offer our prayers along with the persecuted, the lonely, and the sick who have bid our prayers today, that they may be relieved and protected.

Where there is despair, let us sow hope.
For the mission and ministry of the Episcopal Church, especially in the Diocese of New York; that we may listen to the Gospel of reconciliation and proclaim it in word and action for the building of your reign
here on earth, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is darkness, let us sow light.
For all who died in the terror of September 2001 and for those others whom we remember today, for those who believed in your resurrection and those who knew not your promise of eternal life, in trust that they have been found by you and are at rest in your holy habitation, we pray to you, O Lord:

Where there is sadness, let us sow joy.
We pray for the concerns of our parish. And we pray for the forgiveness of our sins.

Grant that we may not so much seek to be consoled as to console;
to be understood, as to understand; to be loved as to love.
Take heart, in Christ we have been reconciled to God.

For it is in giving that we receive, it is in pardoning that we are pardoned;
and it is in dying that we reborn to eternal life.
Amen.


NOTES & REFERENCES

1 Official Website | National September 11 Memorial & Museum

2 Sept 11 Attacks Historical Overview |Wikipedia – the free Encyclopedia.

3 A Proper for September 11 | A Prayer of Peace | The Episcopal Diocese of New York

4 Photo Credit: “Never Forget” tapestry at 911 Memorial in New York City| Original image by Billy Hathorn | Used and modified with permission via Creaive Commons license CC BY 3.0  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), from Wikimedia Commons.

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